RailsConf Europe - In Berlin

Posted almost 7 years back at Liverail - Home

I arrived in Berlin yesterday and the sun was shining, that makes a change from London but today its raining, so exactly like London.

There is a large assembly of Railers, official figures have 39% Germans, 19% Brits, 11% Americans and the rest. Dave Thomas did his keynote last night (more to come) and DHH is just finishing his this morning.

I have some starter pictures for you:

Episode 71: Testing Controllers with RSpec

Posted about 7 years back at Railscasts

Controllers are tricky to test, and there's no perfect way to do it. In this episode you will see how I test controllers, and my reasoning behind it.

Rock The (Rumble) Vote

Posted about 7 years back at zerosum dirt(nap) - Home

We launched the Voting portion of the Rails Rumble on Thursday evening, and so far it’s been a tremendous hit. Almost 4000 unique votes have been recorded in less than two days. If you check out vote.railsrumble.com you can view the current top 10 ranked applications as well as a smattering of random entries.

I want to reiterate once again that I’ve been overwhelmed with the creativity and polish that are reflected in a lot of these entries. Many of them look like the teams spent two months instead of two days. I’m not going to name any names, but I definitely have my list of favorites.

So anyway, get off your butt, register to vote, and help the community choose the best 48-hour app! You don’t even have to go down to the local high school or anything. Woot! The voting period lasts two weeks, and wraps up on the 27th, after which winners will be announced at the Ruby East conference. Maybe I’ll see you there?

Railsconf Europe talk: Making Rails More (Artificially) Intelligent

Posted about 7 years back at Spejman On Rails

Next Tuesday, my colleague Santiago Bel and me will talk about Artificial Intelligence (AI) at the RailsConf Europe. Should you attend the conference, you are invited to our talk too.

We will show you how easily you can introduce AI algorithms into your rails applications in order to improve them. We will talk about 3 kinds of AI algorithms: Bayesian Networks to make predictions, Naïve Bayes Classifier to classify data, and Genetic Algorithms to solve complex problems as automatical optimization of web ads placement.

We hope you find this session interesting and that you enjoy it!

Overlooking The Obvious

Posted about 7 years back at zerosum dirt(nap) - Home

Sometimes we overlook the obvious. This had me scratching my head for a good 15 minutes yesterday. I’ll blame it on the plague (aka nasty cold) that I seem to have contracted.

>> format = "%A, %B %d %Y"
=> "%A, %B %d %Y"
>> monday = Time.now.beginning_of_week
=> Mon Sep 10 00:00:00 -0400 2007
>> monday.strftime(format)
=> "Monday, September 10 2007"
>> (monday+6.weeks).strftime(format)
=> "Monday, October 22 2007"
>> (monday+12.weeks).strftime(format)
=> "Sunday, December 02 2007"

Huh? Exactly 12 weeks from Monday is Sunday? WTF?

>> monday + 12.weeks
=> Sun Dec 02 23:00:00 -0500 2007
>> (monday + 12.weeks).dst?
=> false
>> monday.dst?
=> true

Three letters: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_savings_time">D S T</a>. Heh.

LiveRail off to Berlin RailsConf Europe

Posted about 7 years back at Liverail - Home

Just to confirm that I will be off to Berlin next week and will be hanging around at RailsConf Europe on the 18-19th. If you want to talk RailsDAV, Flex with Rails, Facebook or the state of the media industry in London, ask around for me.

I’ll be blogging from the event also, like many many others ;-)

LiveRail off to Berlin RailsConf Europe

Posted about 7 years back at Liverail - Home

Just to confirm that I will be off to Berlin next week and will be hanging around at RailsConf Europe on the 18-19th. If you want to talk RailsDAV, Flex with Rails, Facebook or the state of the media industry in London, ask around for me.

I’ll be blogging from the event also, like many many others ;-)

How Not to Open-Source

Posted about 7 years back at PJ Hyett

Programmers are arguably some of the smartest people in the world. We solve complex problems all day, every day, and we’re always hungry for more. We strive to find simplicity in even the most complicated situations. If Eistein were alive today, he’d probably be hacking the Linux Kernel along side Alan Cox during his lunch break.

The issue arises when you take those minds, throw in the impersonality of the internet, and mix in a whole bunch of ego.

Case in point: Vlad the Deployer. It was written as a Capistrano replacement to handle application deployment simpler than the aforementioned project. Make no mistake, the library rocks; I’m using it in production already.

Capistrano certainly became the victim of its own success. It needed to be everything to everyone in the Rails community, because it was the only thing out there that handled deployment with any sort of ease.

Futhermore, its author, Jamis Buck, recently said that its dependencies were written at a different time and place than he’s in now and has been working on rewriting them to remove unnecessary complexity. It takes a big person to admit that his hugely successful application needs a lot of work.

It doesn’t take a big person to rip on an open-source app that has been one of the most useful libraries for Rails since the framework’s inception. Vlad’s authors, the Ruby Hit Squad, have made it some bizarre mission of theirs to insult Capistrano in an attempt to promote their replacement. I have no idea what they’re accomplishing with their tactics (see image above for an example) other than alienating someone that dedicates a portion of his time contributing to a framework that allows them to make their livelihood programming in Ruby.

I’m picking on Vlad, but I’ve seen this time and time again with open-source projects and find the attitude unbelievably off-putting as it reflects poorly on the open-source community as a whole. I’m certainly not immune to bad-mouthing projects that I’m not excited about, but I’d like to think that as the years progress that I’m learning to control the emotions that ran rampant when I was 16.

As the saying goes, “Speak softly and carry a big stick, you will go far.” Let others know about your alternative, but allow the code do most of the talking for itself.

How Not to Open-Source

Posted about 7 years back at PJ Hyett

Programmers are arguably some of the smartest people in the world. We solve complex problems all day, every day, and we’re always hungry for more. We strive to find simplicity in even the most complicated situations. If Eistein were alive today, he’d probably be hacking the Linux Kernel along side Alan Cox during his lunch break.

The issue arises when you take those minds, throw in the impersonality of the internet, and mix in a whole bunch of ego.

Case in point: Vlad the Deployer. It was written as a Capistrano replacement to handle application deployment simpler than the aforementioned project. Make no mistake, the library rocks; I’m using it in production already.

Capistrano certainly became the victim of its own success. It needed to be everything to everyone in the Rails community, because it was the only thing out there that handled deployment with any sort of ease.

Futhermore, its author, Jamis Buck, recently said that its dependencies were written at a different time and place than he’s in now and has been working on rewriting them to remove unnecessary complexity. It takes a big person to admit that his hugely successful application needs a lot of work.

It doesn’t take a big person to rip on an open-source app that has been one of the most useful libraries for Rails since the framework’s inception. Vlad’s authors, the Ruby Hit Squad, have made it some bizarre mission of theirs to insult Capistrano in an attempt to promote their replacement. I have no idea what they’re accomplishing with their tactics (see image above for an example) other than alienating someone that dedicates a portion of his time contributing to a framework that allows them to make their livelihood programming in Ruby.

I’m picking on Vlad, but I’ve seen this time and time again with open-source projects and find the attitude unbelievably off-putting as it reflects poorly on the open-source community as a whole. I’m certainly not immune to bad-mouthing projects that I’m not excited about, but I’d like to think that as the years progress that I’m learning to control the emotions that ran rampant when I was 16.

As the saying goes, “Speak softly and carry a big stick, you will go far.” Let others know about your alternative, but allow the code do most of the talking for itself.

RubyBrigade.org - A Rails Rumble Success

Posted about 7 years back at Synthesis

Just wanted to mention our Rails Rumble project, RubyBrigade.org. Jason Perry, James Seaman and I worked through the weekend to build RubyBrigade.org – a geographically aware database of Ruby User groups.

Big thanks to James for the killer hand drawn illustrations and interface. Big thanks to Jason & Katie for letting us take over their house for the weekend.

Features:

  • Google Maps Integration
  • Sub-domains for each group
  • Geocoding: either by the search box or by sub-domain!
  • RSS and iCal feed parsing
  • Display latest user groups
  • Display upcoming events across all groups
  • Display blog posts & upcoming events for individual groups
  • ReCAPTCHA for spam prevention
  • No authentication required

More Screenshots

View a Brigade

Edit a Brigade

Delete a Brigade

404 Message

If you like what you see, vote for us!

Doxtrackr Goes Live

Posted about 7 years back at Alloy Code - Home

After a turbo-charged 48 hour development period, our contest entry has launched! Keith did an outstanding job on our interface, far exceeding merely doing justice to my application code. Even more impressive, we managed to implement everything we intended, and simplified the app at the same time.

Here’s the short list of features:

  • *No* Account Management Required!
  • Easy to share private URLs
  • Document Version & Status Tracking
  • Version specific Comments

I would argue that our greatest success was removing the account management requirement. Most of the Rumble contest sites we’ve viewed so far put the majority of their content behind a login/password screen. A few of the more generous ones support OpenID, a technology I’ve recently come to embrace.

We take pride in being one of the few applications that offers all the benefit of a session-backed user account without any of the account creation/management overhead. Simply provide your name and email address when you upload a document and your account is created for you. If you’ve uploaded additional documents with the same email address, we’ll automatically group them together for you.

Team Red Key

Doxtrackr Goes Live

Posted about 7 years back at Alloy Code - Home

After a turbo-charged 48 hour development period, our contest entry has launched! Keith did an outstanding job on our interface, far exceeding merely doing justice to my application code. Even more impressive, we managed to implement everything we intended, and simplified the app at the same time.

Here’s the short list of features:

  • *No* Account Management Required!
  • Easy to share private URLs
  • Document Version & Status Tracking
  • Version specific Comments

I would argue that our greatest success was removing the account management requirement. Most of the Rumble contest sites we’ve viewed so far put the majority of their content behind a login/password screen. A few of the more generous ones support OpenID, a technology I’ve recently come to embrace.

We take pride in being one of the few applications that offers all the benefit of a session-backed user account without any of the account creation/management overhead. Simply provide your name and email address when you upload a document and your account is created for you. If you’ve uploaded additional documents with the same email address, we’ll automatically group them together for you.

Team Red Key

Who's going to Railsconf?

Posted about 7 years back at The Hobo Blog

So who’s going? Leave a comment.

It would be great to have some kind of Hobo hackathon one evening. There’s nothing formally arranged but I’d imagine we could find a room to squeeze into somewhere.

See you there!

Who's going to Railsconf?

Posted about 7 years back at The Hobo Blog

So who’s going? Leave a comment.

It would be great to have some kind of Hobo hackathon one evening. There’s nothing formally arranged but I’d imagine we could find a room to squeeze into somewhere.

See you there!

Episode 70: Custom Routes

Posted about 7 years back at Railscasts

In this episode you will learn how to add custom routes, make some parameters optional, and add requirements for other parameters.