Links For 12.05.07

Posted almost 7 years back at zerosum dirt(nap) - Home

Waiting at IAD for a connecting flight home (en route from Beijing). It’s snowing. That means delays. I’m tired. But at least I have some time to catch up on blog reading and link posting. Here’s the rundown of goodies on my reading list atm:

Xbox Live Marketplace Video Store Comes to Canada

Posted almost 7 years back at schadenfreude

December 11th is the day Video Marketplace will launch in canada.

Currently only movies will be available but TV shows will soon follow.

The pricing is comparable to what you see in Canada for other video on demand services. For Library titles, movies will be 310 Microsoft Points (Standard Definition) and 460 Points (High Definition), and for Current titles, they’ll be 460 Points (SD) and 610 Points (HD).

So to break that down. $1 CAD = 70 points.

Old title SD: $4.50 Old title HD: $6.60

New title SD: $6.60 New title HD: $8.70

Note: numbers rounded.

November 2007 Hackfest Results

Posted almost 7 years back at Weblog - Home

The competition was tough for the top prize provided by Oakley and it was a pretty close call right up to the end.

See the full results

Congratulations to everybody who took part!

BarCamp in Delhi

Posted almost 7 years back at { :from => Delhi, :about => everything }

Hey Guys, BarCampDelhi3 has been announced. Better be there or you will miss out the best tech get together in town.

I have been involved with both the previous Delhi BarCamps. I have been a planner, speaker, front desk volunteer and a time keeper. I am sure it would be no different this time around. This is something I love about BarCamps. It’s a completely volunteer driven event. There is no organizer and there is no manager. Infact, everybody is the organizer and everybody is the manager. It is a very informal and flexible event.

It is a great platform for individuals, small companies and startups to get themselves or their product or service noticed. Decide on a topic you feel passionate about and if you can speak on it for 20-30 minutes, voila, you would be famous overnight.
If speaking on a topic is too much of an effort for you, blog/photolog/vlog the event, post about it on the wiki and use the tag barcampdelhi3. There are other ways also by which you can participate and help, read about it on the barcamp wiki.

If this will be your first barcamp, be warned, barcampers are a very opinionated group.
See the php vs ruby vs python vs java guys fight it out. Be ready for the Django vs Rails supermacy debate. Don’t miss the Opera vs IE battle. I prefer opera, after all they are sponsoring the drinks ;)
Is somebody from Microsoft reading this blog :)

The third barcamp at Delhi is being held this Saturday, 8th December 2007 at Impetus Technologies in Noida.

Details are on the wiki page here.

Hobo 0.7 released

Posted almost 7 years back at The Hobo Blog

Update:

I said you can pass CSS=y to the rake hobo:fixdryml task to instruct the script to ‘dasherize’ CSS class names. That should have been CLASS=y.

Hobo 0.7 is now available, both as a gem on rubyforge, and in via the repo trunk.

Template tags and non-template tags are now unified. This is really a huge improvement to DRYML. We’ve also switched to dashes instead of underscores for tag and attribute names.

Got any existing DRYML code? It doesn’t work any more. At all :-)

Fortunately, happiness is only a rake task away:

rake hobo:fixdryml

From the changelog:

A rake task hobo:fixdryml has been added which does a pretty good

job of converting Hobo 0.6 DRYML source-code to the new style. It will change every file in app/views//.dryml, and keeps a backup copy of app/views in app_views_before_fixdryml. If you pass it CLASS=y and ID=y it will ‘dasherize’ css classes and IDs too, which is the new Hobo convention. You can also pass DIR=… if you want to point it somewhere other than app/views. It won’t fix anything in erb scriptlets, e.g. use of the tagbody local variable. Expect to do some manual fixes after running the task (good job you’ve got that thorough test suite eh?)

We’ve switched to Rails 2.0 RC2 for our testing. Be warned - there’s a breaking change in Rails that might absorb some of your time as it did mine. It’s a change to fixtures - the default if you don’t give a value for a created_at or updated_at field, is now Time.now. It used to be nil like any other field.

There’s now only one significant feature that I want to add – fixing themes and CSS – before the push to 1.0 begins.

But before that, next up is beta.hobocentral.net!

Hobo 0.7 released

Posted almost 7 years back at The Hobo Blog

Update:

I said you can pass CSS=y to the rake hobo:fixdryml task to instruct the script to ‘dasherize’ CSS class names. That should have been CLASS=y.

Hobo 0.7 is now available, both as a gem on rubyforge, and in via the repo trunk.

Template tags and non-template tags are now unified. This is really a huge improvement to DRYML. We’ve also switched to dashes instead of underscores for tag and attribute names.

Got any existing DRYML code? It doesn’t work any more. At all :-)

Fortunately, happiness is only a rake task away:

rake hobo:fixdryml

From the changelog:

A rake task hobo:fixdryml has been added which does a pretty good

job of converting Hobo 0.6 DRYML source-code to the new style. It will change every file in app/views//.dryml, and keeps a backup copy of app/views in app_views_before_fixdryml. If you pass it CLASS=y and ID=y it will ‘dasherize’ css classes and IDs too, which is the new Hobo convention. You can also pass DIR=… if you want to point it somewhere other than app/views. It won’t fix anything in erb scriptlets, e.g. use of the tagbody local variable. Expect to do some manual fixes after running the task (good job you’ve got that thorough test suite eh?)

We’ve switched to Rails 2.0 RC2 for our testing. Be warned - there’s a breaking change in Rails that might absorb some of your time as it did mine. It’s a change to fixtures - the default if you don’t give a value for a created_at or updated_at field, is now Time.now. It used to be nil like any other field.

There’s now only one significant feature that I want to add – fixing themes and CSS – before the push to 1.0 begins.

But before that, next up is beta.hobocentral.net!

WeoGeo - AWS Startup Challenge Finalist

Posted almost 7 years back at Synthesis

My company WeoGeo made it to the final round of the Amazon Web Services Startup Challenge. In the top 7 out of around 1000 entrants, not too shabby.

Check out the videos for the finalists, and vote for WeoGeo!

Using Relational Data Responsibly

Posted almost 7 years back at Alloy Code - Home

Every Christmas, my father sends gift assortments from Swiss Colony to family members, friends, and former business associates. Last month, he shared with me an interesting story about how Swiss Colony handles repeat customers; which he gave me permission to retell here, because I think it’s a great example of a non-technical company using modern technology effectively.

He started out telling me about a woman who used to work for him 18 years ago, someone whom he has kept in touch with over the years, exchanging a few letters annually. He knew that she had moved recently, but had not yet received her new mailing address. However, when he received his most recent Swiss Colony catalog, he noticed that her address had been updated. He was suitably impressed.

One of my former jobs required me to send periodical mailings to a nationwide group of photojournalists, an activity that probably gave me more insight into business-based bulk mailing than any web application developer would ever care to have. But, it did leave me with an answer as to how her information was likely updated. It would seem that the company runs it’s entire recipient database through an automated service, such as Verimove, in order to keep their mailing address data fresh.

In addition to providing repeat customers with the list of all the recipients who had received gifts the previous year, they also include the previous year’s order for each recipient. It’s a refreshing change of pace from those companies that vacuum up a great deal of information about their customers but then don’t turn it around and use it effectively. Swiss Colony offers, even for it’s mail-order customers, the benefit of relational data.

Taking this a step further for the world of web development, this sort of information can be ideal to use as part of a ‘hook’ strategy to drive return traffic to an application. Instead of just emailing existing users to tell them about new products or services you provide, offer them value by doing a little bit of analysis on the relationships they already have in your systems, and making their experience more convenient.

Using Relational Data Responsibly

Posted almost 7 years back at Alloy Code - Home

Every Christmas, my father sends gift assortments from Swiss Colony to family members, friends, and former business associates. Last month, he shared with me an interesting story about how Swiss Colony handles repeat customers; which he gave me permission to retell here, because I think it’s a great example of a non-technical company using modern technology effectively.

He started out telling me about a woman who used to work for him 18 years ago, someone whom he has kept in touch with over the years, exchanging a few letters annually. He knew that she had moved recently, but had not yet received her new mailing address. However, when he received his most recent Swiss Colony catalog, he noticed that her address had been updated. He was suitably impressed.

One of my former jobs required me to send periodical mailings to a nationwide group of photojournalists, an activity that probably gave me more insight into business-based bulk mailing than any web application developer would ever care to have. But, it did leave me with an answer as to how her information was likely updated. It would seem that the company runs it’s entire recipient database through an automated service, such as Verimove, in order to keep their mailing address data fresh.

In addition to providing repeat customers with the list of all the recipients who had received gifts the previous year, they also include the previous year’s order for each recipient. It’s a refreshing change of pace from those companies that vacuum up a great deal of information about their customers but then don’t turn it around and use it effectively. Swiss Colony offers, even for it’s mail-order customers, the benefit of relational data.

Taking this a step further for the world of web development, this sort of information can be ideal to use as part of a ‘hook’ strategy to drive return traffic to an application. Instead of just emailing existing users to tell them about new products or services you provide, offer them value by doing a little bit of analysis on the relationships they already have in your systems, and making their experience more convenient.

RubyGems mirror update

Posted almost 7 years back at Jonathan.inspect

My RubyGems mirror just got an update :

  • switch to rubygems 1.9.5 0.9.5
  • index generation

If all goes well, it should be compatible with older rubygems versions and give a significantly boost to those using rubygems >= 1.9.5. 0.9.5

Episode 82: HTTP Basic Authentication

Posted almost 7 years back at Railscasts

Rails 2.0 offers an extremely easy way to do HTTP basic authentication. See how in this episode.

Using Relational Data Responsibly

Posted almost 7 years back at Alloy Code - Home

Every Christmas, my father sends gift assortments from Swiss Colony to family members, friends, and former business associates. Last month, he shared with me an interesting story about how Swiss Colony handles repeat customers; which he gave me permission to retell here, because I think it’s a great example of a non-technical company using modern technology effectively.

He started out telling me about a woman who used to work for him 18 years ago, someone whom he has kept in touch with over the years, exchanging a few letters annually. He knew that she had moved recently, but had not yet received her new mailing address. However, when he received his most recent Swiss Colony catalog, he noticed that her address had been updated. He was suitably impressed.

One of my former jobs required me to send periodical mailings to a nationwide group of photojournalists, an activity that probably gave me more insight into business-based bulk mailing than any web application developer would ever care to have. But, it did leave me with an answer as to how her information was likely updated. It would seem that the company runs it’s entire recipient database through an automated service, such as Verimove, in order to keep their mailing address data fresh.

In addition to providing repeat customers with the list of all the recipients who had received gifts the previous year, they also include the previous year’s order for each recipient. It’s a refreshing change of pace from those companies that vacuum up a great deal of information about their customers but then don’t turn it around and use it effectively. Swiss Colony offers, even for it’s mail-order customers, the benefit of relational data.

Taking this a step further for the world of web development, this sort of information can be ideal to use as part of a ‘hook’ strategy to drive return traffic to an application. Instead of just emailing existing users to tell them about new products or services you provide, offer them value by doing a little bit of analysis on the relationships they already have in your systems, and making their experience more convenient.

Using Relational Data Responsibly

Posted almost 7 years back at Alloy Code - Home

Every Christmas, my father sends gift assortments from Swiss Colony to family members, friends, and former business associates. Last month, he shared with me an interesting story about how Swiss Colony handles repeat customers; which he gave me permission to retell here, because I think it’s a great example of a non-technical company using modern technology effectively.

He started out telling me about a woman who used to work for him 18 years ago, someone whom he has kept in touch with over the years, exchanging a few letters annually. He knew that she had moved recently, but had not yet received her new mailing address. However, when he received his most recent Swiss Colony catalog, he noticed that her address had been updated. He was suitably impressed.

One of my former jobs required me to send periodical mailings to a nationwide group of photojournalists, an activity that probably gave me more insight into business-based bulk mailing than any web application developer would ever care to have. But, it did leave me with an answer as to how her information was likely updated. It would seem that the company runs it’s entire recipient database through an automated service, such as Verimove, in order to keep their mailing address data fresh.

In addition to providing repeat customers with the list of all the recipients who had received gifts the previous year, they also include the previous year’s order for each recipient. It’s a refreshing change of pace from those companies that vacuum up a great deal of information about their customers but then don’t turn it around and use it effectively. Swiss Colony offers, even for it’s mail-order customers, the benefit of relational data.

Taking this a step further for the world of web development, this sort of information can be ideal to use as part of a ‘hook’ strategy to drive return traffic to an application. Instead of just emailing existing users to tell them about new products or services you provide, offer them value by doing a little bit of analysis on the relationships they already have in your systems, and making their experience more convenient.

December is docs month!

Posted almost 7 years back at The Hobo Blog

You believe me, don’t you?

OK, OK – I missed my self imposed deadline. November came and went and you folk are still left perusing the source-code. I checked the “November is docs month” post and I did say “no guarantees” :-) Such is life. I have no idea how November managed to get so busy but it did.

On the whole though, I’d have to say that things are looking pretty darn good for this little project.

Hobo 0.7 is essentially ready – I’ve even written the changelog. This release features the long dreamt of (by me and James at least) unification of template tags and, er, the other kind of tag, you know, the normal ones. There is no um-ing and er-ing any more because now there’s just tags. They’re template-like if that’s what you want, and not if you don’t. It’s really rather nice, and makes DRYML feel pretty much done, baring all the little clean-up jobs and performance enhancements between here and 1.0. That’s a big deal.

I’m fairly confident in saying that beta.hobocentral.net, a.k.a. annotated Hobo-app goodness, is going to be out before you know it. I’ll be starting on it first-thing Monday.

And finally, our financial stability seems to have had a bit of a boost with a new client on the scene who are interested in using Hobo for a chunky-sized web-app. I might be able to share more about them at some point.

December is docs month!

Posted almost 7 years back at The Hobo Blog

You believe me, don’t you?

OK, OK – I missed my self imposed deadline. November came and went and you folk are still left perusing the source-code. I checked the “November is docs month” post and I did say “no guarantees” :-) Such is life. I have no idea how November managed to get so busy but it did.

On the whole though, I’d have to say that things are looking pretty darn good for this little project.

Hobo 0.7 is essentially ready – I’ve even written the changelog. This release features the long dreamt of (by me and James at least) unification of template tags and, er, the other kind of tag, you know, the normal ones. There is no um-ing and er-ing any more because now there’s just tags. They’re template-like if that’s what you want, and not if you don’t. It’s really rather nice, and makes DRYML feel pretty much done, baring all the little clean-up jobs and performance enhancements between here and 1.0. That’s a big deal.

I’m fairly confident in saying that beta.hobocentral.net, a.k.a. annotated Hobo-app goodness, is going to be out before you know it. I’ll be starting on it first-thing Monday.

And finally, our financial stability seems to have had a bit of a boost with a new client on the scene who are interested in using Hobo for a chunky-sized web-app. I might be able to share more about them at some point.