Knowledge Base Only

Posted 6 months back at entp hoth blog - Home

Howdy!

While Tender is a great support platform, sometimes all you need is a simple Knowledge Base. So we just deployed an option to do just that. You can find out more in the knowledge base article.

Cheers!

Library, Bologna, Italy

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Library, Bologna, Italy

Turquoise, Lake Sauris, Friuli, Italy

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Turquoise, Lake Sauris, Friuli, Italy

Ancient House, Brittany, France

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Ancient House, Brittany, France

Episode #449– March 18th, 2014

Posted 6 months back at Ruby5

Business time features, Rails is half your app, Rake rule tasks, Polymorphism, Hash Selectors and Rails 4.0.4 released all on today's Ruby 5.

Listen to this episode on Ruby5

Sponsored by Top Ruby Jobs

If you're looking for a top Ruby job or for top Ruby talent, then you should check out Top Ruby Jobs. Top Ruby Jobs is a website dedicated to the best jobs available in the Ruby community.
This episode is sponsored by Top Ruby Jobs

Experimental Features for business hours only.

This week David Celis at New Relic wrote about how his team uses business hours feature flags for new features in production.
Experimental Features for business hours only.

Rails is Half Your App

Marcin Kulik recently sent a blog post entitled “Rails is half of your application”.. Where he explains that there are two parts of your application, the part that only works inside Rails and the part that is independent of Rails.
Rails is Half Your App

Rake Rule Tasks

This week our very own Jacob Swanner wrote about how create “rule” tasks in rake.
Rake Rule Tasks

Back to Basics: Polymorphism

If you’re not familiar with all the different ways that Ruby can be Polymorphic, you definitely should check out Britt Ballard’s post on the Thoughtbot blog.
Back to Basics: Polymorphism

Hash Selector Pattern

Zack Siri wrote to us this week to let us know about a pattern in ruby he’s found helpful he even recorded a screencast and wrote up a blog about it. He’s calling it the Hash Selector Pattern.
Hash Selector Pattern

Rails 4.0.4 released

Last Thursday Rails 4.0.4 was released.
Rails 4.0.4 released

Thank You for Listening to Ruby5

Ruby5 is released Tuesday and Friday mornings. To stay informed about and active with this podcast, we encourage you to do one of the following:

Thank You for Listening to Ruby5

Narrow Street, Dodecanese Islands, Greece

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Narrow Street, Dodecanese Islands, Greece

Phusion Passenger 4.0.39 released

Posted 6 months back at Phusion Corporate Blog

Phusion Passenger is a fast and robust web server and application server for Ruby, Python, Node.js and Meteor. Passenger takes a lot of complexity out of deploying web apps, and adds powerful enterprise-grade features that are useful in production. High-profile companies such as Apple, New York Times, AirBnB, Juniper, American Express, etc are already using it, as well as over 350.000 websites.

Phusion Passenger is under constant maintenance and development. Version 4.0.39 is a bugfix release.

Phusion Passenger also has an Enterprise version which comes with a wide array of additional features. By buying Phusion Passenger Enterprise you will directly sponsor the development of the open source version.

Recent changes

  • Fixed a crash that could happen if the client disconnects while a chunked response is being sent. Fixes issue #1062.
  • In Phusion Passenger Standalone, it is now possible to customize the Nginx configuration file on Heroku. It is now also possible to permanently apply changes to the Nginx configuration file, surviving upgrades. Please refer to the "Advanced configuration" section of the Phusion Passenger Standalone manual for more information.
  • The programming language selection menu in passenger-install-apache2-module and passenger-install-nginx-module only works on terminals that support UTF-8 and that have a UTF-8 capable font. To cater to users who cannot meet these requirements (e.g. PuTTY users using any of the default Windows fonts), it is now possible to switch the menu to a plain text mode by pressing ‘!’. Fixes issue #1066.
  • Fixed printing UTF-8 characters in log files in Phusion Passenger Standalone.
  • It is now possible to dump live backtraces of Python apps through the ‘SIGABRT’ signal.
  • Fixed closing of file descriptors on OS X 10.9.
  • Fixed compilation of native_support on Rubinius.

Installing or upgrading to 4.0.39

OS X OS X Debian Debian Ubuntu Ubuntu
Heroku Heroku Ruby gem Ruby gem Tarball Tarball

Final

Fork us on Github!

Phusion Passenger’s core is open source. Please fork or watch us on Github. :)

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Blue Forest, United Kingdom

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Blue Forest, United Kingdom

Mountain Top, Meteora, Greece

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Mountain Top, Meteora, Greece

Snow Lanterns, West Village, New York City

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Snow Lanterns, West Village, New York City

Forest Steps, Japan

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Forest Steps, Japan

Red Petal Meadow, Mainau, Germany

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Red Petal Meadow, Mainau, Germany

Tile Roof, Provence, France

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Tile Roof, Provence, France

Manage Team and Personal Dotfiles Together with rcm

Posted 6 months back at GIANT ROBOTS SMASHING INTO OTHER GIANT ROBOTS - Home

Our team has a set of dotfiles at thoughtbot/dotfiles. They contain vim, git, zsh, and tmux configuration that many of us use every day.

Each of us also have personal sets of dotfiles. They augment our team dotfiles with configuration such as aliases for our personal workflow, our name and email for git, and vim syntax highlighting for languages such as Go, Scala, Haskell, or Clojure that we're playing with but that we typically don't use on client projects.

We recently released rcm which, among other things, allows a workflow where those two sets of dotfiles co-exist in harmony.

Team dotfiles as primary

The team's dotfiles could be considered the primary dotfiles repo. It is well-vetted and we can depend on it matching the latest conventions and practices agreed upon by our team.

mkdir thoughtbot
cd thoughtbot
git clone https://github.com/thoughtbot/dotfiles.git

Note the directory convention is to keep local git repos matching the {user,organization}/project GitHub structure, which also matches a Go convention.

Once we have our team dotfiles cloned, we should install rcm. On OS X, we can use the Brewfile:

brew bundle dotfiles/Brewfile

See the docs to install on other platforms.

Next, we use rcm's rcup command to symlink files from thoughtbot/dotfiles to ~/.aliases, ~/.gitconfig, ~/.psqlrc, ~/.tmux.conf, ~/.vimrc, ~/.zshrc, and others:

rcup -d dotfiles -x README.md -x LICENSE -x Brewfile

The -x options, which exclude the README.md, LICENSE, and Brewfile files, are needed during installation but can be skipped during future rcup updates because we are symlinking the ~/.rcrc file during installation, which knows to exclude those files.

If we reload our shell at this point, we'd now have all the great features from thoughtbot/dotfiles available to us. The most obvious immediate change would be the look of our prompt.

Personal dotfiles as secondary

Now, we need our personal dotfiles, for example croaky/dotfiles:

mkdir croaky
cd croaky
git clone https://github.com/croaky/dotfiles.git
rcup -d dotfiles -x README.md

That's it! Our two sets of dotfiles are living in harmony. But how does it work?

The .local convention

At the end of the files we symlinked from thoughtbot/dotfiles are lines such as this in ~/.zshrc:

# Local config
[[ -f ~/.zshrc.local ]] && source ~/.zshrc.local

Or this in ~/.vimrc:

" Local config
if filereadable($HOME . "/.vimrc.local")
  source ~/.vimrc.local
endif

These lines say "now, look for a file of the same name as myself, but with an extra .local extension." This convention makes it clean to have a second set of dotfiles around without one trampling on the other.

Most of the files we have in personal dotfiles end in .local. They are additive to the team dotfiles, which is why it can help to think of the personal dotfiles as "secondary."

Overwrite

In some cases, the .local convention isn't available, so we need to completely overwrite the file.

For example, if we use the fail-fast option in our personal rspec config but it is not popular amongst the team, it is inappropriate to live in the team dotfiles, which should represent only a reasonable subset that is valuable for everyone.

In that example, when we next update team dotfiles, rcm asks if we want to overwrite the file:

rcup -d dotfiles
overwrite /Users/croaky/.rspec? [ynaq] n

This demonstrates how rcm lets us pick a winner, and prefer our personal preference in this case.

What's next?

We recommend creating and evolving a set of team dotfiles. We can each learn many workflow tips from our teammates in team dotfiles pull requests.

With rcm's ability to manage both team and personal dotfiles together, there's no reason to be afraid of using team dotfiles, because we can always override the decisions in our personal set.

Spiral Staircase, Trinity College Library, Dublin

Posted 6 months back at omg blog!! lol!!



Spiral Staircase, Trinity College Library, Dublin